National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration
United States Department of Commerce

What's New

November 30, 2016

Dr. Carol Stepien of NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Lab has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Election as a AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers.

This year 391 members have been awarded this honor by AAAS because of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. New Fellows will be presented with an official certificate and a gold and blue (representing science and engineering, respectively) rosette pin on Saturday, 18 February from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. at the AAAS Fellows Forum during the 2017 AAAS Annual Meeting in Boston, Mass.

This year’s AAAS Fellows will be formally announced in the AAAS News & Notes section of the journal Science on 25 November 2016. As part of the Section on Biological Sciences, Carol Stepien was elected as an AAAS Fellow for her distinguished contributions to the fields of molecular evolutionary ecology and conservation genetics, particularly invasive and native populations, and mentorship of graduate and undergraduate students. 

The tradition of AAAS Fellows began in 1874. Currently, members can be considered for the rank of Fellow if nominated by the steering groups of the Association’s 24 sections, or by any three Fellows who are current AAAS members (so long as two of the three sponsors are not affiliated with the nominee’s institution), or by the AAAS chief executive officer. Fellows must have been continuous members of AAAS for four years by the end of the calendar year in which they are elected.

PMEL in the News

December 01, 2016

The Schmidt Ocean Institute is currently live streaming the first science dive with the Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) SuBastian. Join in to see in real time what the Hydrothermal Hunt science team is viewing.

November 22, 2016

For the first time, NOAA and partner scientists have connected the concentration of human-caused carbon dioxide in waters off the U.S. Pacific coast to the dissolving of shells of microscopic marine sea snails called pteropods. Commercially valuable fish such as salmon, sablefish and rock sole...